Posts Tagged ‘Address Labels’

Turn your sketch into Computer Art with Inkscape.

June 29, 2010

If you’re into free and useful stuff, you’ll love Inkscape.
Also, if you’re an artist, and have a collection of your art that you’d like to turn into clip art or other computer art, look no further than Inkscape. Oh, and you’ll need a scanner. Almost every printer out there is a combo printer/scanner, so you should have a scanner or at least know somebody with a scanner.
Here’s an image I scanned:

John

I then imported the image into Inkscape.

Using the “Trace Bitmap” feature, the pic is transformed into a native SVG graphic. Once it’s in SVG format, you can edit the heck out of it and improve the graphics. With a little messing around

John

Once you’ve mastered Inkscape, it’s a cinch to create great artwork for your shipping labels, full sheet labels and address labels.

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Some comments on using MS Access and MS Word for mail merges

December 17, 2009

If you’ve been using MS Excel as a database for addresses to be merged with a primary document in Microsoft Word, and you have Microsoft Access, you’re missing out on a lot of functionality of Access. While Excel has become very close to becoming a database, it’s just plain easier to use a database program like Access to manipulate databases. Doing selects by state or by zipcode is so much easier in Access. But you don’t even need Word to do a mail merge if you have Access. You simply create a report for your address labels. Here’s a database I whipped up from a randomized list. You’ll have to fiddle with it because once you change printers, you have to change the page setup settings.

Printing address labels in Access is challenging

December 14, 2009

If you have Microsoft Access , you will be able to print labels no problem..maybe. The reason I say that is that some labels have no margins on the right or left. Some of our customers still have the Maco M-5363 that are discontinued. If you try to create a report in MS Access for this label layout, you’ll find that your minimum page margins are controlled by your printer. If your printer can’t print full bleed, then you’ll have to experiment around the report layout, and adjust your labels according to your printers margins. If your printer does print full bleed, all the way out to the edge of an 8.5 x 11 page, then you should be able to use the layout I created in Access unmodified. Here is the sample database in Access 2007 format:
http://www.macolabels.com/templates/Database1.accdb

Word Doc Columns converted to Merge Table

December 11, 2009

Among other assumptions, we assume you have Word 2007, and that you have a significant number of names so that cut and pasting would be impractical. The document could be formatted a couple of different ways. If a document has 2 columns, you can have actual columns, or things that look like columns, but are not really columns which I call pseudo columns. Pseudo columns are created like so:

Jack Frost [tab][tab][tab]Victor Frost
1 North Pole Way[tab][tab][tab]2 North Pole Way
North Pole, NJ 07601[tab][tab][tab]North Pole, NJ 07601

Bob Bright [tab][tab][tab]Maggie Moth
22 Ivan Ho Way[tab][tab][tab]393 Manlott Dr
Hackensack, NJ 07601[tab][tab][tab]San Juan, PR 00601

The [tab] represents a tab character. If you did it this way, it’s a bit messy but still workable. To fix it up you need to do a search and replace to convert all multiple tabs to single tabs so that your document will look like:

Jack Frost [tab]Victor Frost
1 North Pole Way[tab]2 North Pole Way
North Pole, NJ 07601[tab]North Pole, NJ 07601

Bob Bright[tab]Maggie Moth
22 Ivan Ho Way[tab]393 Manlott Dr
Hackensack, NJ 07601[tab]San Juan, PR 00601

Then select the whole document, and click on the “Insert” tab. Click on the “Table” icon and select “Convert Text to Table”. Make sure you have the “Paragraphs” radio button selected under the “Separate text at” section. Click OK, then you will have a table with two columns.
Next, you need to cut the second column, then paste it at the bottom of the first column. The result is that you will have two columns of data. Make sure you have a two blank cells as your last two cells in the first column. (Paste the cut column into the very last cell of the first column)
Ok, save the file as an Plain text. Make sure that you you have “MS-DOS” selected and “Insert line breaks” Selected, and “End lines with” “CR/LF” in the “File Conversion” popup window.
Ok, now open the text document in Word. You should have one column of names and addresses.
**actual column start point**
Now you have one column of names that you need to convert to a table. Do a search and replace. Replace all double paragraph marks (^p^p) with single manual page breaks (^m). Next, replace all single paragraph marks (^p) with tab (^t). Now replace all manual page breaks (^m) with manual line breaks (^l). You can now use the file as a merge file, or open the text file directly in Excel, save it as an Excel document and use it as the merge table.
Now I’ll hand it off to Microsoft for merging directions:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/h…
The process would be much the same if you had two true columns. But first you would make the document into 1 column, and just go to the spot I marked as **actual column start point**, and continue.
Ok, so it’s not so easy, but it is the easiest way to do it in my opinion.
If you need a template for the 5164, we’ve got a few to choose from at:
http://www.macolabels.com/ml-0600-templates.html
Our ML-0600 is comparable to the Avery 5164 shipping label.
You could also use the data for an ML-3000 label which is Avery 5160 laser label and inkjet label compatible.

Return Address Labels ML-8100, Avery 5167 Compatible

October 29, 2009

Check out our ML-8100 return address labels. They’re comparable to Avery 5167 Laser Labels. We supply lots of folks with this label who create their own customs designs, and then resell them. But they’re not just for return address labels. Use your imagination and see what uses you can use return address labels for.