Posts Tagged ‘Label’

Seeing the Label – the OO edition

August 10, 2010

I should have included this little tidbit a couple of posts ago, but I didn’t think of it until today. I was poking around in Open Office (OO), and I wondered how difficult it would be to find the same function that I was talking about in that post. I just wanted to be able to turn on or turn off, depending on my need, the non-printing borders that are the borders of each cell in the table of a label. I’m using an ML-3000 label here for example. It seems OpenOffice made it a bit easier to find this feature than in Microsoft Word. Simply go to Table, then Table Boundaries. It’s a toggle, so click to go back and forth between having the lines visible or invisible, and you’ll be seeing the label, or not.

ML-3000, same layout as Avery 5160

The above picture is an ML-3000 template available here.

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ML-0600 Shipping label Flourishes

August 9, 2010

I made a nice design in Inkscape with some flourishes. The ML-0600 shipping label is the perfect label to throw on some flourishes. Whether you’re sending out wedding invitations, or invitations to some sort of celebration, flourishes like the ones below can create the perfect label to show that the event is something special. And we all know how special anniversaries are, right guys? One of the secrets to a lasting marriage is to not only remember your anniversary, but to celebrate it in a meaningful way. So get your flourishes on and celebrate.

ML-0600 template, same as Avery 5164 label template

Maco Tags?

December 4, 2009

Yup, Maco makes tags. They come as stringed tags, and plain unstringed tags. They’ve got many uses. Many industrial companies use them to identify equipment, from engineering firms, to chemical companies, and manufacturers. I guess you could call them industrial tags. So there it is, we don’t just make laser labels and inkjet labels that are Avery label compatible.

Some Mail Merge Examples

December 1, 2009

How you print mailing labels in MSWord depends on how you entered the data in your Excel spreadsheet. At http://www.macolabels.com we see customers who enter address data in Excel in a variety of ways.
The most common way to enter data in Excel is to enter data in assigned columns. The 1st column, column A might be NAME. The 2nd column, column B COMPANY, column C ADDRESS, column D CITY, column E STATE, and column F might be ZIP. Often times, column D, E, and F are put into one field as CITYSTZIP.
If you entered the data in this manner, you will need to create a primary merge document that looks like this:
http://www.macolabels.com/templates/ml-3000-primary.doc
This primary merge document is the same layout as the laser label that Avery makes, the Avery 5160 laser label. It’s also inkjet compatible.

And your address list could look like this:
http://www.macolabels.com/templates/addresslist.xls

For an in detailed tour of the mail merge procedure, check out Microsoft’s site:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/ha010349201033.aspx

Some of our users also enter their address data in to an excel spreadsheet as it might appear on a label. That is, each cell contains the data that prints out on a label.
Something like this:
http://www.macolabels.com/templates/addresslist2.xls
To make this document so that you can merge it with a primary document, make the document into a one column document so that it looks like this:
http://www.macolabels.com/templates/addresslist3.xls
You would then create a primary merge document that would look like this:
http://www.macolabels.com/templates/ml-3000-primary3.doc
Make sure you’ve clicked on the Mailings tab so that you have all the Merging functions to choose from.

Manipulating Graphics in Word

November 23, 2009

Have you ever placed graphics in a word document, and formatted it so that the graphic appears behind the text, and then you can’t figure out how to select it? Well, you can select the clip art. Here’s how. Select the Home tab at the top left. Then select “Select” all the way on the right. It’s right under Find and Replace. Then select “Objects”. Once you do that, you’ll see you can click on and manipulate the graphics. I just used this to select a graphic in one of our Avery 5160 Equivalent Laser labels, at http://www.macolabels.com/ml-3000.html .
Here’s an example of graphics on a label layout: